The Pandemic Crime Lull Is Over–Why?

The Pandemic Crime Lull Is Over–Why?

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Even though the coronavirus pandemic is still ongoing in America, the brief lull in crime stats across the country appears to be over. What happened?

Is There a Link Between BLM Protests and Rising Gun Violence?

CNN reporter Josh Campbell claims that the clash between protesters and law enforcement has eroded any trust between the two groups.

“This isn’t coronavirus but a plague of violence in many American cities as murders and assaults spike during the global pandemic,” Campbell writes.

But is he right? Violent crime in major cities is on the rise. Chicago and New York City appear to be struggling with the biggest spikes in gun violence. Over the last weekend, a total of more than 70 people were victims of gun violence, including four kids under the age of 16 in Chicago.

Bodega ATM Thefts in New York

Property crime is also an issue in major cities. Perhaps criminals have gotten as fed up with social distancing restrictions as the rest of us. In New York, two men literally ripped a cash machine out of an East Village deli.

According to the New York Post interview with Fernando Mateo of the United Bodegas of America, independent deli and corner store owners have seen an uptick in ATM theft.

“It’s like out of a movie script, they must have seen this on TV,” he said, with most raiders ripping off the security gates before using the same rope to tear out the ATM machine.

“It’s scary to see what people are doing and getting away with. Cops are nowhere in sight, NYC is underserved. People don’t respect cops anymore and that is very sad.”

Sobering Statistics from Syracuse, Charleston

It’s not only major cities that are seeing shifting crime statistics during the pandemic. An in-depth report from Syracuse, NY, shows that while overall crime has dropped, violent crime is rising.

Specifically, the city has seen a 33% rise in homicides since this time last year, and an 11% increase compared to the average over the last five years. Many of those deaths are due to gun violence.

According to the report from Chris Libonati with Syracuse.com, “seventeen of the city’s 20 homicides have happened since May. In the last five years, the city has averaged about nine homicides from May through August.”

That’s a major uptick, and one that should be taken seriously as part of a larger pattern of increased violence and homicides. Other areas of the country are dealing with similar crime waves as the summer heats up and the pandemic drags on.

In Charleston, SC, for example, prosecutors are seeking to try three teens as adults after they went on a crime spree that ended in murder. They robbed multiple victims at gunpoint before fatally shooting a 63-year-old man who was enjoying a walk downtown with his wife.

This is a problem that seems to have spread to every metropolis.